Whiteboard Wednesday: Bi-Metallic Friction Welding

Posted by Dan Adams on Jul 13, 2016 6:00:00 AM

Topics: Whiteboard Wednesday

One of the key differentiators between friction welding and other welding techniques is the ability to join dissimilar metals or two different materials that may be impossible to join by other techniques. Doing so is a cost effective way of getting the benefits from both materials. Typically we can use any of the friction welding technologies to weld dissimilar metals, and the following are some common bi-metallic combinations and applications:

Read More

Whiteboard Wednesday: Linear Friction Process

Posted by Dan Adams on Jun 29, 2016 6:00:00 AM

Topics: Whiteboard Wednesday

 

 

Linear friction welding is similar to direct drive rotary friction welding since both are a constant energy input process. But unlike rotary, linear friction welding uses linear oscillation (a repeated back and forth motion) to create a solid state weld. There are two components of the oscillation that drives the energy input:

Read More

Whiteboard Wednesday: Hybrid Process

Posted by Dan Adams on Jun 15, 2016 6:00:00 AM

Topics: Whiteboard Wednesday

The hybrid friction welding cycle is a type of rotary friction welding, and is a combination of the direct drive process and the inertia process.  The direct drive process has a constant energy input using an electric motor. The inertia friction welding cycle, on the other hand, has rotating flywheels that store the energy needed for the weld, which makes it a fixed energy cycle. Hybrid friction welding is a combination of both.

Read More

Whiteboard Wednesday: Which Method is Best

Posted by Dan Adams on Jun 1, 2016 6:00:00 AM

Topics: Whiteboard Wednesday

Which method of friction welding is best? In previous sessions we talked about how most applications can be welded with any of the friction welding technologies. Now, let’s explore several standard rotary friction welding geometries and which rotary technique is best suited for each: inertia, direct drive, or hybrid.

Read More

Friction Stir Welding: Whiteboard Wednesday

Posted by Dan Adams on May 18, 2016 6:00:00 AM

Topics: Whiteboard Wednesday, Friction Stir Welding

Friction Stir Welding is another friction welding technique that has beneficially impacted the aerospace, transportation and electronics industries. Like other friction welding processes, friction stir welding uses frictional heat and force to forge materials together creating extremely high-quality, solid-state joints.

Read More

Whiteboard Wednesday: Linear Friction Welding

Posted by Dan Adams on May 4, 2016 6:00:00 AM

Topics: Whiteboard Wednesday, Linear Friction Welding

Linear friction welding is a solid-state joining process that uses relative motion and high force in order to create enough heat to create a two-piece forging. In linear friction welding, one part is moved back and forth rapidly in a linear reciprocating motion while the other part is forced into it, creating enough heat between the two parts to forge them together.

Read More

Whiteboard Wednesday: Direct Drive Process

Posted by Dan Adams on Apr 20, 2016 6:00:00 AM

Topics: Whiteboard Wednesday

Direct Drive Friction Welding is the oldest form of the rotary friction welding process. Direct Drive friction welding can be used to join a variety of part geometries and materials, making a high quality, solid state joint. Here is the MTI process for direct drive welding:

Read More

Whiteboard Wednesday: Inertia Process

Posted by Dan Adams on Apr 6, 2016 6:00:00 AM

Topics: Whiteboard Wednesday

Inertia friction welding is a variation of the rotary friction welding process. Inertia friction welding uses kinetic energy with applied force to join parts together. The kinetic energy is achieved by the use of flywheels, a set of heavy rotating wheels that are used to store rotational energy. 

Read More

Whiteboard Wednesday: Rotary Friction Welding

Posted by Dan Adams on Mar 23, 2016 6:00:00 AM

Topics: Whiteboard Wednesday, Rotary Friction Welding

 

Rotary friction welding is a flexible technique that can provide many advantages over traditional fusion welding processes. In order to use the rotary friction welding process, you must have one part that is symmetric around its rotating axis. The non-rotating component, can also be symmetrical but does not have to be.

There are three main types of rotary friction welding—Inertia, direct drive and hybrid friction welding. Each technique offers a unique advantage depending upon the type of materials being welded as well as the shape or geometries of the materials. Let’s take a look at some application examples.

Read More

Whiteboard Wednesday: Need to Know Mechanical Properties

Posted by Dan Adams on Mar 9, 2016 6:00:00 AM

Topics: Whiteboard Wednesday

 
In rotary friction welding, a weld is created by rotating one part while keeping the other part still and applying the right amount of force between the two materials. Not only does this process quickly and efficiently bond two parts together into one, but it also creates what is known as grain refinement, which makes the new part just as strong as a single solid part.
Read More

Whiteboard Wednesday: Why Friction Welding Part 3

Posted by Dan Adams on Feb 24, 2016 6:00:00 AM

Topics: Whiteboard Wednesday

You may not realize it, but friction welded parts are part of your everyday life.  A good example of an everyday application of friction welding can be found in a component used with automobile air bag inflators. This component is found in steering , wheels, glove boxes, dash boards, seats, and side panels, and since every car needs air bags, this component has a very high volume demand. The tricky part is that, due to the intricacy of the specific component shown in the video, it could not be made from a single piece.

Read More

Whiteboard Wednesday: Why Friction Welding Part 2

Posted by Dan Adams on Feb 3, 2016 6:00:00 AM

Topics: Whiteboard Wednesday

One small part — the lift screw — is a great example of what makes friction welding so useful. It’s a part you might find in an automobile power seat, or in the wing of an airplane, where it helps raise and lower the flaps.

There are a couple traditional ways to produce a lift screw:

Read More

Whiteboard Wednesday: Why Friction Welding Part 1

Posted by Dan Adams on Jan 21, 2016 7:00:00 AM

Topics: Whiteboard Wednesday

Friction welding in the United States started in the late 1960s when Caterpillar Tractor Company wanted to produce hydraulic cylinder rods, or piston rods.

A key challenge they faced was that many of these parts were made out of single-piece forgings, which were — and still are — very expensive to produce. When they examined all of their parts, they found they had a smaller number of eyes than clevises, and they wanted to be able to weld these rods to different lengths and diameters. Friction welding allowed them to create two-piece forgings that would be much less expensive to produce.

Read More

Friction Welding 101: Whiteboard Wednesday

Posted by Dan Adams on Dec 23, 2015 8:48:15 AM

Topics: Whiteboard Wednesday

 

Friction welding is a solid state joining process. It’s actually a forging process: not a welding process. In the Friction Welding process we use relative motion and high force in order to create frictional heat at the weld interface. This heats the materials being joined to the point where they will plasticize without melting. The result is molecular intermixing at the weld interface and a forged quality joint.

Read More

Subscribe to Machine Talk Blog

About MTI

In 1926 our founder, Conrad Adams, may not have been able to visualize all the great things ahead for his family’s small tool and die company. However, he could see a bright future solving problems for his customers. Through hard work and a steadfast dedication to solving their most challenging manufacturing problems, the little company from South Bend, Indiana became the world-leader in friction welding technologies, providing engineered solutions from golf putters to jet engines. Today – eight decades and four generations later – MTI’s commitment continues with a solid succession plan and a vision for GREATNESS in place for the next generation.