Rotary, Linear, and Friction Stir Welding Differences

Topics: Linear Friction Welding, Friction Stir Welding, Rotary Friction Welding

Posted by: Bob Besse on Dec 12, 2016 6:00:00 AM

Rotary Friction Welding, Linear Friction Welding, Friction Stir Welding

Friction welding is a forging technique that produces ultra-strong bonds for diverse applications. This process has been the answer to many manufacturing and engineering challenges for over five decades. From aerospace to automotive, friction welding is continually opening the possibilities for ongoing technological advancement.

There are a variety of friction welding techniques to choose from, and each offers its own unique advantages. Which one will accommodate your manufacturing demands? Examine the graphic below to see which process is best for your manufacturing needs:

  • Rotary Friction Welding — most popular type of friction welding and used for parts where at least one piece is rotationally-symmetrical such as tube or bar.
  • Linear Friction Welding — used for jet engine components, near-net shapes, and more where the limitation on the parts is only based upon the mass of the moving part; not the geometry of the interface.
  • Friction Stir Welding — often used for aluminum plates, extrusions, and sheets where seam or butt welds are made between thin components without a restriction on the component length.

Compare to see which friction welding solution might work well for you:

How It Works

  • Rotary Friction Weldinga solid-state process in which one part is rotated at a high speed, and then pressed against another part that is held stationary. The resulting friction heats the parts, causing them to forge together.
  • Linear Friction Welding: a solid-state process in which one part moves in a linear motion at a high speed. This is pressed against another part that is kept stationary. The resulting friction heats the parts, causing them to forge together.
  • Friction Stir Welding: A solid-state joining process in which a pin tool rotates against the seam, between the two stationary parts, to create extremely high-quality, high-strength joints with low distortion.

Advantages

  • Rotary Friction Welding
    • 100% bond at the contact area
    • Ability to join dissimilar materials
    • Minimal joint preparation required
    • Fast weld cycles, allowing more parts to be joined in less time
    • Less inventory required to create part families
    • Eco-friendly since no consumables are used
    • Scalable to any size weld
  • Linear Friction Welding
    • A rapid, repeatable, and flexible process
    • Ability to join nearly any number of shapes with complex part geometries
    • Ability to join dissimilar metals
    • Minimal joint preparation required; resulting in faster production
    • Eco-friendly since no consumables are used
    • Scalable to any size weld
  • Friction Stir Welding
    • Affords new joining applications for difficult manufacturing challenges- from extrusions to sheets and more
    • Virtually defect-free bonding
    • Accomodate parts up to 55 feet long
    • Ability to join dissimilar alloys
    • Ability to use dual head feature for fast panel welding
    • Minimal distortion of joined parts, for extremely high-weld strength
    • Eco-friendly since no consumables are used

Top Applications

  • Rotary Friction Welding
    • Aerospace
    • Agricultural
    • Automotive
    • Construction
    • Consumer products
    • Oil and Gas 
    • Military
  • Linear Friction Welding
    • Aerospace
    • Automotive
    • Military
    • Oil and Gas
  • Friction Stir Welding
    • Aerospace
    • Electronics
    • Marine
    • Military
    • Transportation

Make It Better

MTI solves difficult challenges every day. For customized parts, or the machines that make them, you can count on us. Whether you’re designing aircraft, tractors, or anything in between — we can build a machine to make your part, make your part for you, or help you make your part even better.

Learn more on Rotary Friction Welding, Linear Friction Welding and Friction Stir Welding or watch how friction welding can be put to work for you.

 

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About MTI

In 1926 our founder, Conrad Adams, may not have been able to visualize all the great things ahead for his family’s small tool and die company. However, he could see a bright future solving problems for his customers. Through hard work and a steadfast dedication to solving their most challenging manufacturing problems, the little company from South Bend, Indiana became the world-leader in friction welding technologies, providing engineered solutions from golf putters to jet engines. Today – nine decades and four generations later – MTI’s commitment continues with a solid succession plan and a vision for GREATNESS in place for the next generation.